Spirituality

Earthly Ambition

Hi all! Been a few days since I posted – life seems to have become busier of late! I’ve been thinking a lot in recent days about going back to work. Staying home with my daughter is the most fulfilling job I’ve ever held. I love it more than I can say. I also think it’s a fabulous way to raise a child. On the other hand, many of the things my husband and I would like to achieve over the next few years would necessitate a second income. I know that the longer I remain out of the workforce, the harder it will be to find a job. So, what to do? I decided to look at this issue from a biblical standpoint, but I’m not feeling terribly guided one way or another.

The verse that comes to mind when I’m using money as motivation is Mark 10:25: It is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to enter the kingdom of God. This verse always rankles a little bit for me because I feel like the tendency is to gloss over it, or take it in whatever way one likes best. It’s a question of where to draw the line. I feel that Jesus is cautioning against becoming too attached to this world, or to the things in it that don’t really matter. But how do I know when I’m in too deep? Probably, I’m already there. Aren’t most of us?

And then I consider God’s gifts and rewards to his people in the Old Testament. He blessed people with livestock, land, children… He used riches of this world as a reward for faithfulness. Deuteronomy 20:14: As for the women, the children, the livestock and everything else in the city, you may take these as plunder for yourselves. And you may use the plunder the Lord your God gives you from your enemies. That’s just one example. Does Jesus’ sacrifice make the Old Testament gifts a moot point? What guidance does the Bible give for this situation?

I’m praying and doing my best to be honest with myself, but I’d love to hear your thoughts! Thanks!

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3 thoughts on “Earthly Ambition

  1. I learned a long time ago that there are far more important things in life than money. I appreciate being paid for the work I do, but I have no need to become wealthy. I believe the Bible teaches us to be generous with whatever we have, but not to worry about accumulating wealth.

    That being said, I am a strong advocate for being a good steward of our financial resources. So, I don’t waste much. I recycle and reuse, and I buy things used. In addition, I save for things so that I don’t have to borrow and pay the additional cost of interest. I also saved so we could buy a car for each of our sons when they became 16 (not new!), saved so they could go to college, and now I am saving for retirement.

    I live simply, without wasting money, and I recommend that habit to others.

    1. Agree on all counts! Thanks for responding. And while I think that advice is applicable regardless of the amount of money you make, I guess what I’m struggling with is whether I should go back to work when we can certainly do without for a while longer. I suppose it boils down to personal priorities and what is right for my family, but I wouldn’t mind a nice, clear sign one way or the other! 🙂 (Large and neon would be fine. hehe.)

  2. Riches are a problem! But perhaps it’s our response to them that is the real issue. Whether we are rich or poor, our love of money can get in the way of our relationship with The Teacher. We all sin; we all have a tendency to have idols. Jesus has the power to allow a camel to pass through the eye of a needle, and to allow us followers to be heirs to heaven. After all, He’s the One who came that we might have life, and have it more abundantly.

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